Her husband put her dead body in embalming fluid to admire her forever

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Esther Lachmann alias Thérèse Lachmann, later marquise de Païva and her tiara— Image courtesy of Wikimedia

While most courtesans ended up penniless, this was not the case for Esther Lachmann. Born on May 7th, 1819, in Moscow, Russia, Lachmann was the most famous courtesan of her time. Also known as La Païva, she was the daughter of Martin Lachmann and Anna Amalie Klein. Her parents were German and Polish Jews and she grew up in an impoverished household.

Early life

Lachmann went on to marry her first husband, Antoine François Hyacinthe Villoing, in 1836. Villoing was a tailor, and the couple welcomed their only son together, Antoine Jr, in 1837.

Lachmann didn’t divorce her husband but, instead, ran away from him and their son to Paris and adopted the name, Therese. She stayed in a cheap hotel, Maison de Passe, during her first few years in the city. Maison de Passe was a well-known home for prostitutes where mainly low-class men spent their time. …


America’s richest black girl, Sarah Rector

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Sarah Rector (1886–1957), taken inside the Rector Mansion in the 1920s. — Photo courtesy of the Rector descendants.

Born on March 3rd, 1902 in Taft, Oklahoma, United States, Sarah Rector, later on, became the richest black girl in America. She was the daughter of Joseph Rector and Rose McQueen. Rector grew up in quite a large family alongside her siblings, Roy, Rebecca, Rosa, Lillie, Joe Jr., and Lou Alice.

The Acts that changed everything

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Sarah Rector’s land allotments on the Cimarron River is highlighted
on “Hastain’s Township Plats of the Creek Nation,” 1910. —Image courtesy of
Diane Euston

Muscogee Creek Indians enslaved both Rector’s maternal grandmother and paternal great-grandfather.

However, in 1866, after the civil war and the abolishment of slavery, Rector’s ancestors became freedmen. Also, her ancestors became members of the tribes that had enslaved them.

In 1887, the Federal government introduced the Dawes Act. The act resulted in many Native Americans losing their land as it was deemed excess. …


The woman advertised as the “Baboon lady”, “Dog-faced woman”, “Ape-faced woman”, and “Bear Woman.”

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Julia Pastrana (before 1900) — a footnote on her poster says Miss Julia Pastrana, a miracle of the world that speaks English, and Spanish, singing and dancing admirably. — image courtesy of wikimedia.org

The case of Julia Pastrana led to many theories being born about her origin. These speculations also arose because her face had a gorilla-like appearance, among other body features. One of the most popular theories was that Pastrana was a hybrid between an animal and a human.

Birth

Pastrana was born in August 1834 in Sinaloa, Mexico. She suffered from a genetic condition known as hypertrichosis terminalis (also known as generalized hypertrichosis lanuginosa). The condition caused the growth of long black hair all over her body. Besides this, Pastrana had an irregular double set of upper and lower teeth.

Early life

Julia Pastrana’s true origin is still debatable to this day. …


The inspiration behind Savage Grace

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Barbara Daly Baekeland and his son Anthony — image courtesy of Wikipedia

Born in Cambridge on September 28, 1921, this is the story of Barbara Daly Baekeland. Daly was a prominent American socialite in New York City. In January 1933, Daly’s father, Frank Daly, committed suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning from the exhaust. After her father’s death, she relocated to New York City with her mother, Nina Daly. They stayed in the Delmonico Hotel in the city. At that time, it was one of the elite hotels around.

Daly was named one of New York’s ten most beautiful girls. This paved her way into the modelling industry, where she worked with Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar often. …


How the confession of Jennet Device led to the execution of ten Pendle witches

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Statue of Alice Nutter, one of the accused Pendle witches, in Lancashire, England —image by Graham Demaline

Jennet Device was born in 1603 in Pendle Hill, Lancashire. She was the daughter of Elizabeth Device and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Southern, who was also known as Demdike. Device lived with her family at her grandmother’s house, the Malkin Tower. Device was the major witness in a witch trial that resulted in the hanging of her mother, brother, sister, and many neighbors.

This is a story that went on 400 years ago. …


Meet the most ruthless body snatcher in history

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Edward Gein (1906–1984) and his objects made from human parts —images by Stacey Russell and Michelle Pruitt

His full name was Edward Theodore Gein. Besides being a serial killer, he is also famous for being a body snatcher. He was the inspiration behind some horror films villains such as Ezra in Deranged, Leatherface in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Buffalo Bill in The Silence of the Lambs, and Norman Bates in Psycho. This man also inspired the production of many documentaries and books.

Gein was the son of Augusta Wilhelmine Gein and George Philip Gein. His mother was raised in an extremely strict household, and she was a victim of physical abuse as she grew up. Gein’s father grew up as an orphan and worked multiple jobs, he was also an alcoholic and physically abusive toward his wife. …


History’s prolific female serial killer who gained the titles, Countess of Blood and Countess Dracula

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Elizabeth Bathory’s Portrait — image courtesy of Wikimedia

This is the story of one of the deadliest and most feared female killers in history, Elizabeth or Erzsebet Bathory, who was also a countess. Bathory was known as Countess Elizabeth Bathory De Ecsed, and she was Hungarian.

Bathory was born on August 7th, 1560, in Nyirbator, into the noble family of the Bathory’s estate. Bathory’s parents were blood relatives, and her father was Baron George VI Bathory. Her father was brothers with the highest-ranking official within Hungary’s kingdom, the Voivode of Transylvania, Andrew Bonaventure Bathory. Bathory’s mother, Anna Bathory, was also a noble.

Bathory’s uncle was the King of Poland. She was also related to the Grand Duke of Lithuania and the Prince of Transylvania. Also, Bathory’s brother, Stephen Bathory, was the judge royal of Hungary. Therefore, Bathory grew up in an extremely wealthy family. She had the privilege of the best education and enjoyed social power. However, she frequently suffered from intense seizures caused by epilepsy. …


The cult that led to 909 deaths

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The crime scene for the mass suicide in 1978(left) and Rev. Jim Warren Jones in 1977 (right) — images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

On November 18th, 1978, over 900 people committed suicide in the Jonestown settlement in Guyana. They were members of the People’s Temple, a cult religion led by Reverend Jim Jones. Most of the people willingly swallowed a punch mixed with cyanide. Others were injected with the chemical, as confirmed by the injection marks found on their bodies. Those who retaliated were shot dead, and only a very few survived the incident.

Now, the question is, what led all these people to take their own lives willingly?

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Rev. Cecil Williams and Rev. Jim Jones at an anti-eviction rally at the I-Hotel, 848 Kearny Street in San Francisco, January 1977 — image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

His full name was Jim Warren Jones and he was the son of Lynetta Jones and James Jones, born on May 13th, 1931. His father was a veteran of World War 1 and lived on disability payments because of being a gas attack victim during the war. His mother was described as a free-spirited woman who didn’t hold any religious beliefs. Jones grew up in Indiana and always lacked attention from his parents. As a teenager, he was very passionate about the Bible and would always carry it with him. Jones would sometimes preach the Bible on the street to people. When Jones was around seventeen, he managed to get a job at a hospital. …

About

Lioness Rue

Lover of writing, nature, history and romance. Inspired by the magic of love! ....I believe -One who wants to wear the crown bears the crown-

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