Andrei Tapalaga ✒️

There is a peaceful way to get to them

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Daryl Davis and a Ku Klux Klan member about 30 years ago (Source: NPR)

Daryl Davis is the first black person to befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan. Not only that, but for the last thirty years, this man has been making members of this Klan take down their robes and change their whole racist mentality. What is more interesting about this case is that he has done all this without a single drop of hate or violence, showing that violence only inflicts more violence, which isn’t the way to bring peace on Earth.

Attracting KKK members with his music

From a young age, Davis had always dreamed of becoming a big blues musician, and he knew that the only way to get there is through hard work. Most of his free time was spent playing in various pubs across the country with his band. At the time when Davis met his first KKK member, he was the only black man in his band. The gig at which they were playing happened to host an all-white venue, but this did not discourage Davis. …


Isle Koch

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Ilse Koch is sentenced to life in prison by Brigadier General Emil C. Kiel (back to camera) at the trial of former camp personnel and prisoners from Buchenwald. (Source: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum)

Ilse Koch was the wife of Karl Otto Koch, commander of the Nazi concentration camp at Buchenwald, but the drunkenness of power made her more famous than her husband. The “Buchenwald bitch,” as the sadistic chief of guards was called by the prisoners of the camp, orchestrated the most obscene tortures, a very obscure one being the collection of tattooed skin of death row inmates, from which she made lampshades.

On April 11, 1945, American soldiers entered the Nazi camp at Buchenwald and froze. Today, 68 years after the holocaust, those horrific images are preserved as a testimony to the most sadistic historical injustices. …


The first attempt of modern biological warfare

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The Romanian Army traversing into Bulgaria on a temporary bridge in 1913 (Source: Tiparia)

During the invasion of Bulgaria by Romania in the Second Balkan War, both armies lost thousands of soldiers, but no bullet was fired. An unseen enemy decimated the fighting troops, causing the first suspicion of biological warfare in modern history.

In 1913, against the background of the Second Balkan War, Romania was to launch one of the most bizarre military campaigns in the entire history of East Europe. …


Witches were considered worst than criminals

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Suspected witch in dunking stool (Source: History Collection)

The practice of black magic has long been considered a heinous crime, similar to rape or murder. Hammurabi’s code from the 18th century B.C. contained details of witchcraft, and many medieval systems contained specific parameters for identifying, judging, and executing suspicious witches and wizards. From barbaric torture and occult desserts to the detection of witches, here is a list of evidence that would have indicated in the past the existence of a person who practiced black magic.

1. Swimming test

People accused of witchcraft were dragged to the first place with water, undressed, and thrown into the water for judges to see if the person was floating or sinking. Since the witches would disregard the Baptist oath, it was considered that the water would not allow the body to sink. According to this logic, an innocent person would have sunk like a stone, and a witch would have floated to the surface. The victim usually had a rope tied to the middle through which he could be pulled out of the water if he sank, but they often died due to drowning. …


An era where the word hygiene didn’t exist

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Illustration of a medieval bathhouse from the 14th century (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

During the early period of the 14th century, going to a public bath became a common activity as, at the time, having a bath in a tub or even a pool was considered quite the luxury. Most people who partook in this activity were peasants who could only afford basic needs, and hygiene wasn't one of them. Besides the extremely unhygienic practice, there have been many stories of sexual abuse in such places as there was no segregation between men and women.

Bath of diseases

In our modern society, when you go to a public pool you will find that a good percentage of the water you swim in is mixed with chlorine in order to kill most of the bacteria that are brought in. Well, in the 14th century, chlorine wasn’t as readily available and as such wasn’t used, therefore you would have hundreds of people bathing in the same water. Some of these public baths didn’t change the water on a regular basis, they would just add some more or wait for it to rain if the bath was outside. …


In the order of their significant importance

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Neatherdals living in a cave (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Over time, the human species has been curious to discover its own origins. The need for civilization to connect with its own past was driven by that curiosity, so excavations were made at archeological sites. It is absolutely incredible the sort of discoveries that have been found and imagining what other incredible secrets can be found. As far, some of these discoveries really helped to justify our origins and map out how man has evolved.

5. Lascaux Cave

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Lascaux Cave (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Lascaux is a wide cave in southwestern France, well known for its 2,000 cave paintings. Its importance is special given the fact that it is the largest cave in France, but also the best preserved. These paintings represent figures of animals (bison, cats, birds, rhinos, bears, deer, cattle), human forms and abstract signs. The paintings determine which animals were most valued. The cave was discovered on September 12, 1940, by 4 teenagers. In 1948 Lascaux was already a monument open to visitors, but a large number of visitors changed the type of climate inside, so the cave was closed in 1963. However, later the cave was reopened. …


Another overseen case of false advertising

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Photo by United Nations COVID-19 Response on Unsplash

There are many cases of overseen false advertising in huge corporations which even if people discover it is false advertising, there isn’t much to do as some of these monopolies which have created this sort of advertising have simply become too powerful.

In this case, I want to discuss our everyday soap (no matter in what form this may come) which we have used for many years and we crucially hang onto with the current pandemic. Most companies that sell soap products advertise them as 99% efficient or in better words, it kills 99% of bacteria.

Have you ever wonder why is that? Or better yet, if this is actually true?


The evolution of medieval carrier pigeon

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Inserting a pigeon into a Missile (Source: MIT Technology Review)

During World War II, the U.S. Navy, along with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NSIT), trained pigeons to beak glider screens so that the military could drop bombs without being endangered the safety of soldiers. This method was the beginning of the construction of touch screens. The same screen that the pigeons touched is now in phones, tablets, and other devices.

Without the help of satellites or GPS, the trajectory of the bombs was often changed after launch due to the wind. …


Accident or the Catholic's doing?

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London Burning in 1666 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

On September 2, 1666, the heart of the British land was devastated by a strong fire. The disaster was so great that it would go down in history as the Great Fire of London. How did it all start? With an accident in a bakery in Pudding Lane or, as it was believed for 150 years, with a Catholic conspiracy?

Fires were not uncommon in London, they were inevitable, given a large number of wooden buildings specific to the era. Many expected the city to be destroyed by fire one day. Even in 1665, King Charles II had warned the Mayor that the narrow streets and wooden houses were a huge danger. …


The evolution of humanity

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Fictive Adam and Even (Source: Earth Invasion Author: Paulo Dias)

What is the cause of physical differences between people and what do these differences reveal about our origin? These questions have troubled the human race since antiquity. The father of medicine, Hippocrates, supported the idea of ​​geographical determinism, arguing that the environment, climate, and other regional factors leave a mark on the physical and behavioral aspects of the entire population. He considered every different race represented by different colors had their own characteristics that made them unique.

The Roman emperor Julian the Apostate, the last pagan emperor (he reigned in 361–363 AD), considered that men and women were created in several stages. He had noticed that there were significant physical differences between Germans, Scythians, and Ethiopians, and he could not imagine how these peoples could come from a single ancestor; in his opinion, there would have been separate creations for each nation. …


Sentenced to 15 years of prison at the age of 92

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Baba Anujka (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Would you or anyone think that such a cute little granny would be able to kill a bee, let alone 150 people? She was arrested twice, escaping most of the charges in the absence of evidence. She had been active for half a century and it is believed that she had killed over 150 people. The most feared assassin in Europe was a grandmother from Serbia, known as Baba Anujka.

People from distant lands resorted to Grandma Anujka for medicine. She liked to brag that her treatments never failed, that even aristocrats were looking for her to cure small daily inconveniences. What is imperative to mention is that she also offered a very special service. For a sufficient sum, Grandmother Anujka also prepared the cure to “remove” a person who had become uncomfortable. …


Nasīr al-Dīn Tūsī (1332–1406)

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Depiction of Nasīr al-Dīn Tūsī (1332–1406) (Source: https://aalequtub.com/)

In his work called Akhlaq-i-Nasri, Nasīr al-Dīn Tūsī, a Persian thinker of the Middle Ages, issued a theory of evolution that has the basic principles of Darwinian’s theory of evolution. Tusi begins his theory with the evolution of the universe which first contained equal and similar elements. According to Tusi, internal contradictions are beginning to emerge as a result — some substances have begun to develop faster and differently than other substances. Then he explains how the elements evolved into minerals, then into plants, then into animals, and then into humans.

Tusi then explains how hereditary variability was a factor in the biological evolution of…


Charlie Chaplin's finest work

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Charles Chaplin & Jack Oakie playing as Hitler as the characters pretending to be Adolf Hitler and Benito Mousallinin 1940 (Source: The Great Dictator)

The film “The Great Dictator” was written and directed by Charles Chaplin, who also played the lead role. Released on the big screen on October 15, 1940, the film is a satire on Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime. Chaplin’s film is exceptional, especially because, although filming began in 1937, it foreshadowed Hitler’s aggressive policy that led to World War II.

In the context of the year in which it appeared, the film proved an act of special courage not only because the United States, the place where Chaplin produced this film, was not in conflict with Nazi Germany, but also for portraying persecution of Jews across Europe. …


Is it the same reason some countries still tolerate it today?

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Joachim Beuckelaer — Brothel — Walters (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

In the late Middle Ages, the number of brothels reached an all-time high peak which helped grow the economy around the world because they maintained an activity that men could not give up. It is a historical taboo that has recently come to the attention of researchers. Sex with prostitutes is not an easy to-talk-about-topic at all, it is quite infamous because, even today, there is no discussion about such a thing. It is another one of those topics that people are very well aware of but chose not to speak about it.

This is a very well-offered topic, as the medievalist Herm von Seggern from the University of Cologne, who in this case researched the history of sexuality from the late Middle Ages to the 16th century, shows us. He draws our attention to the fact that we are dealing with many parallels with the present. Prostitution is still taboo and in many parts of the earth still tolerated. The issue at hand can be seen from two different perspectives. …


Baba Vanga

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Baba Vanga in 1990 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Baba Vanga, named Vanghelia Pandeva Dimitrova, was born on January 31, 1911, and died on August 11, 1996, at the age of 85. After marriage, she took the name Vanghelia Gusterova and lived most of her life in the Rupite area in the Kozhuh Mountains, Bulgaria. Vanghelia was a blind herbal healer who many people thought possessed paranormal abilities. She only found out of these abilities later in life with 85% of her predictions proving true. Therefore she was nicknamed Baba Vanga, baba meaning and old lady and Vanga being short for Vanghelia.

Baba Vanga was a premature baby who had many health problems throughout her life. Her father fought in the Bulgarian army in World War I, and her mother died when she was still young. Vanga was an intelligent child, with blue eyes, blond hair and as a child, she used to spend a lot of time with the healer from her village. A turning point in her life was when she was caught in the field by a storm and had been blind ever since. …


Sex in 15th century France

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Skin Lesions of Secondary Syphilis (Source: Daily Mercury)

When King Charles VIII of France invaded Naples in 1495 a new disease appeared among his soldiers, later named as syphilis, which at the time was an extremely serious disease and whose spread was extremely rapid, as was the case in Europe in the late fifteenth century. Although its mortality cannot be compared to the bubonic plague, it was still one of the most dangerous diseases in human history.

The symptoms were painful as well as repulsive and there were only a few remedies that proved to be more harmful than effective. Sexually transmitted diseases, such as syphilis, in this case, had been the cause of death for many soldiers throughout history. …


He gave a third of his life for his people

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Nelson Mandela in Prison (Source: Black History Month)

Throughout history, many impactful people have dedicated a part of their life or even made the ultimate sacrifice for a cause. But in my eyes, no person in history has fought for his people and country like Nelson Mandela. The courage showed by going against powerful people and the dedication of always staying strong to give hope to his beloved South Africans is what inspired the whole world at the end of the 20th century.

A man of justice

Since a young age, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela wanted to study law in order to fight for justice in a world where justice was not served. After finishing his studies at the University of Witwatersrand, he pursued a career as a lawyer for a short period of time in Johannesburg. …


Human torture at unimaginable levels

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Some of the Children used in Medical Experiments During 1944–1945 (Source: Jewish Virtual Library)

Disclaimer: Some of the images seen in this article may affect you emotionally.

Nazi medical experiments in concentration camps affected a wide range of prisoners like Jews, Roma, Poles, Russians, but also German people with various disabilities. The experiments can be divided into several categories according to the reason why they were performed. Some had tried to reinforce the idea that the Aryan race is superior to all others, others were made to provide information to the military about the resilience of the human body in various conditions, while some prisoners were used as guinea pigs for various drugs.

There had also been medical experiments that had no real purpose but were born only out of pure sick curiosity of those who performed and conducted them such as finding a cure for homosexuality or injecting substances into the eyes of detainees to change the color of the iris. …


Sisters who died to protect all other women

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Patricia, Maria Teresa, and Minerva Mirabal — Original Images Owned by the Mirabal Family (Source: Guide to the Colonial Zone and the Dominican Republic)

“If they kill me, I’ll take my arms out of the grave and be stronger.”

With these words, Dominican activist Minerva Mirabal responded in the early 1960s to all those who warned her of what seemed to be a secret known to all: the regime of President Rafael Leónidas Trujillo (1930–1961) would kill her. Then, on November 25, 1960, her body was found at the bottom of a ravine, inside a jeep, with two of her sisters, Patricia and María Teresa, and the driver of the car, Rufino de la Cruz.

More than half a century later, Minerva’s promise seems to have come true. The work of the Dominican secret police and the death of the sisters are considered as major factors that led to the fall of Trujillo’s regime. The Mirabal sisters’ name has become a global symbol of women’s struggle, as, since November 25, has been celebrated around the world as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.


The tragic story of Philomena Lee’s son

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Anthony Lee and one of the nuns from the church in Roscrea, Ireland in 1955 (Source: Daily Mail)

Throughout history, it has been mentioned that the Catholic church took part in some unorthodox business, to say the least, but most of the cases cannot be proved. However, one more recent case from seventy years ago cannot be denied. This is the case of Philomena Lee’s son (Anthony Lee), who was given in adoption in exchange for a nice sum of money without the mother even knowing about it.

Philomena Lee still suffering after decades

At the time of this article’s writing, Philomena is eighty-seven years old and still suffering from the trauma she had to live in her past. But to get a better understanding of the whole story, we need to go back when Philomena was only eighteen years old, and two months pregnant with Anthony. …


Forced to walk until they dropped dead

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Depiction of Native Americans being forced to walk for days on end (source: Trails of Tears Association)

On May 28, 1830, the Indian Removal Act was enacted, allowing the then American president, Andrew Jackson, to negotiate the relocation of Native American tribes east of the Mississippi River to its west, freeing these territories from exploitation.

This transmutation proved to be catastrophic for the five tribes who left their lands, having to run thousands of miles to their new home. This road produced thousands of victims, the severe conditions and diseases being the main culprits for their death.

This mass migration was called by one of the participants “The Trail of Tears,” the name under which this genocide has remained known to this day. The life of Native Americans before the enactment of the 1830 law has been a very harsh one as they were not offered much freedom. From the seventeenth century, from the establishment of the first colonies in the present territory of the United States, until the nineteenth century, the lands belonging to various Native American tribes came into the possession of the new European inhabitants. …


As far as science can tell

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Ethiopia’s geothermal field Dallol is full of acidic (source: Free Press Journal)

Scientists have discovered that in a geothermal region of Earth the environmental conditions are so harsh that they can not sustain any form of life, despite previous research that could have indicated otherwise. The study could be relevant for determining the limiting conditions of life even where there is liquid water. It is one of the harshest environments on Earth, namely the Dallol geothermal region, an extremely hot, salty, and acidic one.

The ponds stretch along a volcanic crater, located in the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia, where daytime temperatures exceed 45 degrees Celsius even in winter. Some of the hyperacid salt ponds have extreme negative pH values. After a series of tests, researchers found that there is no life in the ponds, not even microorganisms. …


As we enter autumn we want to offer our dear readers a big thank you as always for the support they have given us as well as the constructive feedback which has been taken on board.

With that being said there will be some upcoming changes to the publication in order to raise the quality as well as the variety of content offered. Therefore we ask all of our writers and whoever may want to become a writer in the future to keep an eye on the submission rules and guidelines as they will be updated this very week.

News

With our publication growing bigger and bigger every day we were in the need of another editor, with this occasion, I want to give a warm welcome to our new editor Christina Dalcher! Her vast knowledge and experience as a writer will be invaluable to our publication, our writers and, most importantly you, our readers. …


Communism made some great things

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The apartment building right before being shifted into the new position 1978

In 1978 the communist era was blooming in Romania as the Soviet Union was trying to change everything in Romania, from the army to even the architectural style of the towns into a Soviet look alike country, this is a big reason why many people argue today that Romania should be included as a Slavic country and not only seen as one. Most of the buildings in the cities were made up of massive apartment blocks. The city of Alba Iulia has one of the most beautiful boulevards around Europe and this is thanks to this god-like action.

The reason for moving the block

The plan was to create a majestic boulevard to go with the medieval town of Alba Iulia and at the same time create a touristic attraction, however, at the end of the planned boulevard stood a big challenge, a massive apartment block. …


In a time where nobody believed in mental illnesses

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An illustration of the Bedlam Insane Asylum, from an 18th-century engraving by William Hogarth

About five centuries ago, the philosopher, humanist, and theologian Erasmus of Rotterdam wrote “The Praise of Madness,” a terrible satire book representing the society in which he lived. Unfortunately, this book remains relevant because not much has changed since the time of Erasmus, or nothing has changed for the better. For example, society’s perspective on the “crazy” and the “healthy” is that mental normalcy is still perceived by the majority as not suffering from any mental illness.

Was madness given by the gods or provoked by evil spirits?

The skulls of the Australopithecus, Neanderthals, and even Homo sapiens of the Stone Age and early civilizations often bear traces of trepanations (points of the skull being perforated intentionally). It is believed that the ancient shamans opened the “gates” through which evil spirits were forced out of the “patient’s” mind by “specific procedures.” …

About

Andrei Tapalaga ✒️

Avid Writer with invaluable knowledge in Business Studies, History and Psychology. “You make your own life” atapalaga97@gmail.com

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